conflict resolution facilitation and negotiation for business - basics of conflict resolution facilitation and outlining a simple process for business
conflict resolution facilitation and negotiation for business - basics of conflict resolution facilitation and outlining a simple process for business
conflict resolution facilitation and negotiation for business - basics of conflict resolution facilitation and outlining a simple process for business

Conflict Resolution and Negotiation



Conflict Resolution Tools Every Business Needs


Conflicts can cripple relationships between co-workers, between businesses partnering with one another, between businesses and customers, and between businesses and communities.

Conflicts in the workplace can create costs due to wasting time, making poor choices, turnover, reassigning jobs to keep warring parties apart, employee sabotage or theft, low motivation, and higher health care costs.

A study conducted in the 1990's found that managers spend 42 percent of their time turning conflicts into agreements. 1

Lingering conflicts can drain an organization's resources, limit its alternatives, and cloud its vision. Serious conflicts can lead to the breakup or bankruptcy of the organization through a slow downward spiral or a catastrophic court case.

Listening plays a central role in both conflict and conflict resolution in a business environment.

Conflict occurs because people are wired to fight or flee under excess pressure. In particular, it's only human nature to move to an offensive or defensive position when feeling threatened or uncertain. Unfortunately, communication and trust break down when one or more parties to a business relationship take an inflexible position.

Conflicts can be defused and pushed in the direction of consensual solutions by asking the parties in conflict to complete a simple exercise in which each listens to the others, is aware of being listened to by the others, and collaborates with the others in working towards agreement. Going through this process together lessens feelings of threat and uncertainty by better informing each about the others and their common problems. At the same time, each experiences the others showing them respect and their willingness to cooperate. After this exchange of listening, the parties often are able to take a business-like "win-win" stake in working together.

Conflict resolution processes are powerful because listening and being listened to costs almost nothing and can rapidly rob conflicts of momentum and/or bring them to resolution.

This segment of businessLISTENING.com, entitled Conflict Resolution Tools Every Business Needs, was written by Bruce Wilson and is based in part on a series of conversations he had with professional mediator-facilitators Heidi and Dan Chay. It has four parts:

Part I presents an overview of Conflict Resolution Basics for Business.

Part II presents A Simple Process for Resolving Business Conflicts.

Part III presents Q&A With Mediator-Facilitators Heidi and Dan Chay that explores in greater depth why an exchange of listening between parties in conflict reduces conflict and builds relationships.

An appendix offers Recommended Reading For Conflict Resolution in Business for those who want to learn more.

Additional source material:
1 Daniel Dana, Conflict Resolution (McGraw-Hill, 2001), pp. 29, 56.


Overview

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Detailed Description of Topics

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Listening Strategy and Skills

Leadership
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Conflict Resolution and Negotiation

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Listening Books

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Editorial

Contact Us


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Home Page | Detailed Description of Topics | Listening Strategy and Skills | Leadership and Teams | Customer Relationships in Sales and Marketing | Conflict Resolution and Negotiation | Listening Books | Contributors | Editorial | Contact Us |


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